Valencia, Spain

September 6-8

  • The multidisciplinary
    science of rheology

    Towards a healthy and sustainable development

  • The multidisciplinary
    science of rheology

    Towards a healthy and sustainable development

  • The multidisciplinary
    science of rheology

    Towards a healthy and sustainable development

  • The multidisciplinary
    science of rheology

    Towards a healthy and sustainable development

  • The multidisciplinary
    science of rheology

    Towards a healthy and sustainable development

  • The multidisciplinary
    science of rheology

    Towards a healthy and sustainable development

  • The multidisciplinary
    science of rheology

    Towards a healthy and sustainable development

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Leonard Sagis

Leonard Sagis obtained an MSc in Chemical Engineering from Eindhoven University of Technology in 1990, and a PhD in Chemical Engineering from Texas A&M University in 1994. In 1998, after postdoc positions at the physical chemistry department of Leiden University and the Institute of Technical Chemistry of the University of Amsterdam, he joined Wageningen University, where he is currently a faculty member in the Physics and Physical Chemistry of Food Group. Since 2011 he is also a member of the Polymer Physics Group of the Department of Materials, at ETH Zurich in Switzerland. His research interests are in the field of Soft Interface Dominated Materials, such as emulsions, foams, microcapsules, or hydrogel beads, and in particular in the relation between the microstructure of these systems, and their properties and stability. His current focus is on the nonlinear dynamic behavior of oil-water and air-water interfaces stabilized by anisotropic colloidal particles or soft hydrogel nanoparticles (Pickering systems), and interfaces stabilized by amphiphilic biopolymers. He is also involved in the design of multipurpose nanoparticle-based delivery systems. He uses a multidisciplinary multiscale approach to study these systems, which combines experimental methods (bulk and surface rheology, scattering techniques, microscopy), computational methods (MC, NEMD simulations), and theoretical methods (nonequilibrium thermodynamics).